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Rediscovering My First Collection of Poetry: Norton Anthology

The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, Richard Ellman, Robert O'Clair, Famous Poets

Who would have thought I could come to love and appreciate a book from the Creative Writing class I took, when I was a sophomore in college? I think I actually loathed all 1,456 pages of that gargantuan anthology at the time. Yet, today it has become a treasured jewel to me.

As I thumbed through this illustrious first volume of The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, copy written and published in 1973, I found a note from one of my classmates, asking about an assignment we needed to complete for this class. Our professor, Dr. Ashley asked the class to do an analysis of assigned poems or a character sketch depicted in the poems. For this particular assignment, we were to do an analysis of a poem by Allen Ginsberg. Although I don’t remember which one of his poems we were assigned to analyze, that handwritten note from my classmate remains a nostalgic book marker, within the pages of this great anthology.

Among the many famous poets included in this great collection are works by Carl Sandburg, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Countee Cullen, Jean Toomer, W.S. Merwin, Nikki Giovanni, Randall Jarrell, Patrick Kavanagh and E. E. Cummings to name a few. My trip down memory lane is a route to a new journey on my never-ending poetic highway. It’s amazing how the lessons we learned, the ones we passionately love dearly, are the catalysts for our personal, spiritual and professional growth, and development.

Positively and Poetically Yours!

 
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Posted by on October 1, 2014 in Books, Poetry

 

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Poet Tree Bird House Contest

Poet Tree Bird House Contest, Bird Houses with Poetry, Poetry, From Behind the Pen

I am pleased to work with the Indian Trail Cultural Arts Center to plan and implement our first poetry/art media competition. Our Poet Tree Bird House Contest is FREE to enter and offered to residents in the surrounding area of the Indian Trail Cultural Arts Center.

Entrants will decorate unfinished birdhouses, that are produced, provided and sponsored by Peddlers Marketplace, located on Highway 74, in Indian Trail, North Carolina. Contestants will create a themed poem and creatively decorate their bird house to complement their poem. Any type of artistic medium can be used (paint, plaster, Papier-mâché, recycled embellishments, etc.) for decorating. The poem will be incorporated on one of the interior walls of the bird house, where it can be easily visible and readable for the audience, as they view the exhibits. Participants are encouraged to use their imagination as boldly as they would like to, but they must refrain from anything offensive or vulgar (in their poems or décor).

Entries will be judged in two categories: Children and Adults. Each category will be based on the best poem, best decorated bird house and best overall presentation. Winners will be announced at the November Open Mic event where each winner will read their poem and present their bird house. Anyone in the area interested in competing in the Poet Tree Bird House Contest, may contact Susan Didier sdidier@admin.indiantrail.org.

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2014 in Contests, Poetry

 

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September is American Newspaper Month

Newspapers And Glasses, American Newspapers, American Newspaper MonthAccording to the Newspaper Association of America, newspapers are still here and still making money. An August, 2014 article stated in part:

The sky is always falling and newspapers are always dying. For more than a decade, that has been a common and constant refrain. I have been asked frequently about the state of the industry as people search for the worst. Though newspaper media is enjoying the largest audiences ever, there is one fact that always tends to be obscured or outright ignored – newspapers are still making money and newspapers remain a good investment.

In a list compiled by Wikipedia.org, the top 25 newspapers by circulation in the United States Includes:

The Wall Street Journal
The New York Times
USA Today
Los Angeles Times
Daily News (New York)
New York Post
The Washington Post
Chicago Sun-Times
The Denver Post
Chicago Tribune
The Dallas Morning News
Newsday (New York)
Houston Chronicle
The Orange County Register
Newark Star-Ledger
Tampa Bay Times
The Plain Dealer (Cleveland)
The Philadelphia Inquirer/
Philadelphia Daily News
Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
The Arizona Republic
Honolulu Star Advertiser
Las Vegas Review-Journal
The San Diego Union-Tribune
Boston Globe
Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Additionally, they list the longest running newspapers in the United States to include:

The New Hampshire Gazette (1756)
The Hartford Courant (1764 – the oldest daily)
The Poughkeepsie Journal (1785)
The Augusta Chronicle (1785)
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (1786, July)
Daily Hampshire Gazette (1786, September)
The Berkshire Eagle (1789)
The Recorder (1792)
Rutland Herald (1794)
Norwich Bulletin (1796)
The Keene Sentinel (1799)
New York Post (1801)
The Post and Courier (1803)
Fayetteville Observer (1816)
The Post-Standard (1829)
The Barnstable Patriot (1830)

So why not visit your nearest newstand today and indulge in some good ole page turning nostalgia, that only a newspaper brings!

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2014 in Celebrations, News

 

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Celebrating a Year of Poetry with the Indian Trail Cultural Arts Center

Kym Gordon Moore, Indian Trail Cultural Arts Center, Poetry Open Mic, Poetry AnniversaryA year ago, I never thought I would be talking about my amazing journey of poetry, with an intimate community of diverse poets. It began with a simple question that I emailed to Susan Didier, the Community Development Specialist for the Town of Indian Trail. I asked if poetry open mic readings or other poetry related events were offered by the center. Sadly she said no, but invited me to stop by to discuss developing something. Initially, I thought the plan would be for a one-time poetry reading. However, here we are one year later, celebrating my first anniversary of working with Susan to develop what would be the “First” of many “Firsts” from our collaborations in poetry. We called this anniversary celebration “Picnic of Poetry,” our last hoorah for the summer.

Since my first “Conversations in Poetry” open mic reading in September, 2013, we witnessed a growing community of poets and poetry enthusiasts who became involved with our initiative. Another “first” came when I sent out invitations to Mayors around North Carolina to issue a proclamation on behalf of their city or town, to recognize April as National Poetry Month. I was humbled to receive responses from many Mayors who agreed to participate in my project. During National Poetry Month (NPM) 2014, Mayor Michael Alvarez of Indian Trail read and issued his Mayoral Proclamation for this historical commemoration. Click here to see the video recapping that monumental event. Another special moment in poetry occurred when I facilitated the first poetry workshop for children that Susan and I planned. Eleven children from age 5 to 12 participated in this workshop. They were taught the fundamentals of poetry, recited poems they created during the session, and displayed a collage they designed inspired by their poems. This was a free workshop and participants were rewarded with a certificate of completion and gifts.

Last Saturday, as we celebrated our first anniversary, at the Indian Trail Cultural Arts Center, a fresh pot of poetry gumbo was being served, with spectacular ingredients for a hearty poetic appetite. Appearing on the menu was a true Thespian reciting Shakespeare, personal reflections from a Pulitzer Prize Nominee, spiritual revelations delivered by a Spoken Word artist, a recital by a five-year old, who is a published author of a children’s illustration book, poetic verses accompanied by the art of an accomplished violinist, and many personal stanzas of reflection shared by other local poets.

The Picnic of Poetry festivities brought out an amazing night of incredible talent performed by poets Amanda Vilani, Dwight Roth, Kyla McKenzie, Robert Hinson, Christian George, Michael Faulkenberry, Alan Pearce, Tara Trent, Rome D’Carlo and Ryan Petty. A special audience-involved poetry musical postlude was performed by open mic regular Chip Long, accompanied by poet and guitarist, Dwight Roth. Susan Didier caught the proverbial poetry bug and read her poem, “The Dynamic Start” that highlighted how the poetry revolution began, with the first time she and I met in her office, at the Cultural Arts Center. Click on the photos below for individual captions.

I officially established my Poets for Hunger© mission and partnered with the Cultural Arts Center to begin collecting canned goods and non-perishable food items for Common Cupboard. Common Cupboard is a food pantry established in 2006, by Common Heart. We will continue to collect these food items, at the October and November poetry open mic events, to benefit those in need within our community. Keith Adams, Executive Director of Common Heart, addressed the audience with history about the organization’s humble beginnings, ongoing dedicated mission and amazing contributions they are making to those who need it, in the community.

Last, but not least, we announced the call for entries in our very first “Poet Tree Bird House Contest.” Applications were available for those who wanted to participate and there are two categories – one for adults and one for children. Judging will be based on the best decorated bird house, the best poem and best overall, in both categories. Judging will be done in late October and the winners will be announced during our November Open Mic night. The undecorated bird houses are provided by Peddlers Marketplace, on Highway 74 in Indian Trail.

To say the least, this had been an incredible year of many historical “firsts” for me, on my poetic journey. It is such an honor to meet so many poetry enthusiasts, artists, musicians and supporters of this genre, who have enriched my life in a magnificent way. I look forward to preparing an even larger pot of poetry gumbo, to feed more hungry poetry souls, on the road ahead! Thanks Susan Didier! To our poets, old and new, you guys ROCK!

LONG LIVE POETRY!!!

 
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Posted by on September 18, 2014 in Celebrations, Poetry

 

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Celebrating National Thank You Day!

Thank you, Appreciation, Thanks, Gratitude“The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the grandest intention.”

If ever there should be an expression of gratitude, it should be every day. Today we uplift and celebrate the gift of two words, that we fail to use as often as we should. Those two beautiful words are “Thank You.”

Did someone open a door for you to enter? Did someone allow you to pull in front of them during rush hour this morning? Did someone pick up something you dropped on the floor and hand it back to you? Did someone make breakfast for you this morning? Did someone do something kind for you today? Did someone pay you a compliment?  Did someone make a difference in your life?

“Thank you” is a common courtesy that you express to others, who extended some act of kindness to you, regardless of how big it may be. If someone mentored or inspired you to do bigger and better things, then write them a note, send them a card or give them a call and just say “Thank you.” You have no idea how much that can make a person’s day!

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2014 in Celebrations, Empowerment

 

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Using Poetry to Support Local Food Drive

Poets for Hunger, Indian Trail Cultural Arts Center, Common Cupboard, Common Heart, Food Drive

 

 

 
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Posted by on September 12, 2014 in Community Outreach, Poetry

 

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September 11th Cannot Escape Our Memory

9-11, Terrorist Attacks on USA, September 11

 
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Posted by on September 11, 2014 in Memorial

 

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