New Writing Resources!

As promised, I am passing on information and resources to help you in your writing pursuits. Many of these resources are FREE information to utilize. Whether you are a novice or a veteran, I urge you to bookmark the sites that interest you and take advantage of the wealth of information that is out there for you to utilize. Though there is no guarantee of accuracy, the information contained herein is believed to be reliable.

United States Copyright Office http://www.copyright.gov/

Electronic Copyright Office http://www.copyright.gov/eco/index.html

Find out how to register your work. Copyright search engine is easy to use. Note that mailed submissions to the Copyright Office may be severely delayed. Use a private carrier like FedEx or UPS instead.

FindLaw® http://smallbusiness.findlaw.com/intellectual-property/

Clear and concise articles on what is copyrightable, why to register your work, ownership of rights and enforcing your rights. A good place to visit before registering with the US Copyright Office.

U.S. Legal Forms http://www.uslegalforms.com/

Clearinghouse for over 36,000 legal forms that are free or available for purchase online. Includes state-specific forms. Writers will appreciate the templates for contracts, rights assignments and intellectual property filings.

R.R. Bowker, the US ISBN Agency http://www.isbn.org/standards/home/index.asp

R.R. Bowker is the authorized ISBN Agency in the United States, responsible for assigning ISBNs as well as providing information and advice on the uses of the ISBN system to publishers and the publishing industry in general. (An ISBN, or International Standard Book Number, is a 10-digit number that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally.) Their website includes instructions for publishers or self-published authors to obtain an ISBN for their titles.

Copyright, Fair Use and the New Borrowers  http://www.nyfa.org/level3.asp?id=463&fid=6&sid=17

Postmodern art raises novel copyright questions by extensively appropriating words, images and sounds from existing works by other artists. This article from the New York Foundation for the Arts summarizes a new report by New York University’s Brennan Center about the extent to which copyright law’s “fair use” doctrine protects such artworks from infringement claims.

Here’s to your writing pursuits! From Behind the Pen,

Kym www.kymgmoore.com

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