Let’s Write About National Potato Chip Day

potato chips, snacks, potato, food

Image credit: http://www.ebth.com

What is your favorite brand of potato chips? Lays, Wise, Kettle, Utz, Pringles or Lance? Today, March 14 is National Potato Chip Day. When I was growing up there was a popular brand of potato chips I would always get teased about called Gordon’s Potato Chips. Those were the best chips and I loved them. Of course, to my knowledge even though our last name was Gordon, we were not related to the founders of these flavorful potato chips. In high school, however, I was given the nickname “Chips” because of the brand name. To this day, I still have one friend who calls me Chips!

Americans consume approximately 1.2 billion pounds of potato chips each year! That’s a lot of potato chips! This statistic is not surprising since potato chips tops the number one snack almost everyone serves at their party, for a cookout, to travel with or on picnics. The potato chip or crisp (British English in the UK) is a thin slice of potato that is deep-fried, kettle cooked, baked or popped. They are commonly served as a snack, appetizer or side dish. Today various flavorings and ingredients are added to the potato (herbs, cheeses, spices) to offer a variety of potato chips.

potato chips, crisps, snacks, foodThe earliest known recipe for potato chips is in William Kitchiner’s 1822 cookbook The Cook’s Oracle, a bestseller in England and the United States; its recipe for “Potatoes fried in Slices or Shavings” reads “peel large potatoes, slice them about a quarter of an inch thick, or cut them in shavings round and round, as you would peel a lemon; dry them well in a clean cloth, and fry them in lard or dripping”. Early recipes for potato chips in the United States are found in Mary Randolph’s Virginia House-Wife (1824), and in N.K.M. Lee’s Cook’s Own Book (1832), both of which explicitly cite The Cook’s Oracle, a bestseller in England and the United States; its recipe for “Potatoes fried in Slices or Shavings” reads “peel large potatoes, slice them about a quarter of an inch thick, or cut them in shavings round and round, as you would peel a lemon; dry them well in a clean cloth, and fry them in lard or dripping”. Early recipes for potato chips in the United States are found in Mary Randolph’s Virginia House-Wife (1824), and in N.K.M. Lee’s Cook’s Own Book (1832), both of which explicitly cite Kitchiner.

So whether you like your potato chips plain, barbecue, salt and vinegar, sour cream and onion, sweet potato, vegetable or wavy, be sure to get your crunch on today as you celebrate National Potato Chip Day!

 

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