Harvest Moon Light Poetry

Harvest Moon, Lunar, Moon

Image Credit: Pixaby

This year has been a historically exciting year of astronomical events around the world. From the Comet 45P/HMP in February to the Lyrids meteor shower in April to the Total Solar Eclipse in August, there is no doubt a great deal of galactic activity constantly going on above us, whether we are aware of them or not.

Get ready stargazers because tonight you get to witness the Harvest Moon. Although it most commonly appears in September, this is the closest full moon to the autumn equinox appearing tonight. It is traditionally known as the Harvest Moon because it gave farmers more light and time to gather their crops for the winter. So grab those binoculars and telescopes and drink in the grand mystique of tonight’s Harvest Moon! Of course, many of the moon’s surface features are also noticeably visible.

Harvest Moon Light

Look up, can you see it
ascending majestically on the eastern horizon
as the sun descends in the western sky
the crown of a perfect lunar sphere rises
an orange radiance illuminating in the twilight
I want to mount on a hill and sing passionately
like the lovesick harmony of a wolf’s howl
the light of the night, shine on Harvest Moon.
– ©Kym Gordon Moore

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The Poetry Energizer: Windmill Rising

Poetry, Windmills, Energy

Energy. We are a nation of overindulging consumers. In our ongoing search for energy-efficiency, however, there are many simple things each one of us can do to conserve energy. One of the most affordable forms of electricity today is wind energy. Windmills have been around for centuries and with recent improvements in turbine technology, consumers can take advantage of affordable costs for wind energy.

I love the artistic, architectural uniqueness and functionality of a windmill. These mammoth wind-driven towers are well known in any landscape it resides. In honor of the windmill, I would like to pay tribute to these incredible structures with my poem, Windmill Rising.

Windmill Rising

Here I stand, an artistic pillar
in a picturesque prairie amid wild flowers
a stealth tower lavished by tall grass and wheat
overseeing the brackish waters of an estuary

like the nose of an airplane, I valiantly emerge
from the ground my post is hollow, towering or smock
rotating energy through sails, blades or vanes
converting a sweep of the wind, I dare stand

like the roundhouse kick of a black-belt ninja
generating electricity, extracting groundwater
wind pumps, turbines, gristmills, the power wheel
I am wind-driven, mighty I pump, stoically I stand.

© Kym Gordon Moore

Recreationl Adventure in the Park

Park and Recreation Month , Parks, Recreation

Image Credit: nrpa.org

Regardless of whether parks are local or National picturesque landscapes, they are an adventure in so many natural and historical ways. July is Park and Recreation Month and the National Recreation and Park Association urges, everyone, to discover the power of play and adventure. What are some of the local or national parks you have visited or plan to visit? Parks are explorations of recreational fun to relish and enjoy.

We’re going to pause for a few minutes to spotlight some breathtaking views from a few of our national parks that can take your breath away. Enjoy!

national parks, parks and recreation month, landscape

Utah’s Arches National Park Scenic View

 

Acadia National Park, National Parks, Parks and Recreation Month

Pall in Acadia National Park

 

Mt. Rushmore, Parks and Recreation Month

Mt. Rushmore

 

Desert View Tower, Grand Canyon, National Parks, Parks and Recreation Month

Desert View Tower, Grand Canyon

 

Yellowstone National Park , Parks and Recreation Month, National Parks

River winds through the wilds of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming

 

Sand Dune near Stovepipe Wells in Death Valley National Park, Parks and Recreation Month

Sand Dune near Stovepipe Wells in Death Valley National Park

 

Glacier National Park, Parks and Recreation Month

Wildflowers in Glacier National Park

 

Saguaro National Monument, Parks and Recreation Month

Huge rock at top of a mountain at the Saguaro National Monument in Arizona

 

Bryce Canyon National Park, Parks and Recreation Month

Sun rises over the tall orange rock formations of Bryce Canyon National Park

Celebrating the Earth

Earth Day, Environment, Nature, From Behind the Pen

Image source: Divine Organics

Our world is full of life, but it is in trouble due to the destruction we are largely creating. Do you believe climate change is real? I certainly do, simply from witnessing opposing seasons interlocking at some point with each other and on the other side of the world, glaciers are melting in temperatures way below zero.

Earth Day is on April 22 and is the world’s largest environmental movement. Since the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, more than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, with a focus on education, public policy, and consumer campaigns.

This year’s campaign is “Environmental & Climate Literacy.” Learn more about how you can get involved and take action to eliminate pollution, planting trees and tending gardens, curbing greenhouse emissions or to help power the movement. Visit the Earth Day Network.

The Fluid of Our Life on World Water Day

World Water Day, Water Scarcity, Water Conservation

Do we take water for granted? How often do you think about the overall health of the water you drink, the showers and baths you take, the water you wash your hair with or the water in your swimming pool? Would you believe that over 663 million people still lack access to clean drinking water?

Well, today is World Water Day folks. I’d like for us to pause for a moment to observe, to learn and teach others how to take action and make a difference in caring for the health of the water in our homes, in our rivers, streams and oceans, the water used to irrigate crops and what livestock drink. How can we be more responsible water stewards?

The one critical thing we really miss outside of food during natural disasters or soil contamination is water. Our carelessness with pollutants infiltrating our oceans, creeks, streams, rivers and soil is a call to action for immediate changes in our habits, policies, and advocacy for clean water, regardless of who you are. Why? For one thing, water is one of the most essential elements to health that prevents dehydration and ensures survival. Furthermore, the human brain is made up of 95% water, the lungs consist of 90% water and the blood 82%.

We must also hold those corporations accountable who carelessly pollute our environment with chemicals that contaminate our soil which eventually work their way into our crops and water supply sources. The results of such recklessly and disregard regardless of whose responsibility it is can pose traumatic and deadly health issues to innocent people that no amount of money can cure.

So today, let’s not only pause to observe World Water Day but let’s do everything in our power to preserve and conserve this all-important necessity essential to our health and welfare.

 

Today We Observe World Oceans Day

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? It is the name given to a massive dump of floating garbage and debris found in the Pacific Ocean. Not only is this an environmental threat to marine life, but it is also a health threat to humans.

Today we observe World Oceans Day. The solution however, for cleaner oceans goes beyond this one day. The theme for this year is Healthy oceans, healthy planet. World Oceans Day, held every June 8th, is the United Nations recognized day of ocean celebration and action. People all over our blue planet organize celebrations – which can be a huge event in your community, a special announcement, or anything in between – to support action to protect the ocean.

Check out The Ocean Cleanup, the largest cleanup in history. http://www.theoceancleanup.com/.

Plant a Tree on National Arbor Day

Arbor Day, The Canopy Project, Planting TreesGo ahead and plant a tree today! Today is National Arbor Day and across the nation we are promoting and celebrating the importance of trees. In 1872, when J. Sterling Morton founded Arbor Day, his idea was to simply set aside a special day for tree planting. Trees serve some very vital purposes essential for beautifying our planet, for environmental benefits and improving the human condition. On the heels of celebrating Earth Day on Wednesday April 22, National Arbor Day taps into forests and grasslands in our cities, states and nation, to look for opportunities to learn about, educate and preserve our trees.

According to forestry.about.com, here are 10 reasons why living trees are valuable:

Trees Produce Oxygen
Trees Clean the Soil
Trees Control Noise Pollution
Trees Slow Storm Water Runoff
Trees Are Carbon Sinks
Trees Clean the Air
Trees Shade and Cool
Trees Act as Windbreaks
Trees Fight Soil Erosion
Trees Increase Property Values

Learn more about National Arbor Day at the Arbor Day Foundation. Get an online tree guide, learn about programs and ways you can take action and discover techniques on how to care for our forests, nurture and celebrate trees.

Happy National Arbor Day!