William Wordsworth, Poetry on An April Morning

William Wordsworth, Poetry

Image Source: Academy of American Poets

Today, during National Poetry Month we commemorate the birthday of William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850). This major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature. His magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years. This work was posthumously titled and published, before which it was generally known as “The Poem to Coleridge.

In celebration of National Poetry Month, we are featuring his poem, It Was An April Morning Fresh and Clear.

It Was An April Morning: Fresh And Clear
by William Wordsworth

It was an April morning: fresh and clear
The Rivulet, delighting in its strength,
Ran with a young man’s speed; and yet the voice
Of waters which the winter had supplied
Was softened down into a vernal tone.
The spirit of enjoyment and desire,
And hopes and wishes, from all living things
Went circling, like a multitude of sounds.
The budding groves seemed eager to urge on
The steps of June; as if their various hues
Were only hindrances that stood between
Them and their object: but, meanwhile, prevailed
Such an entire contentment in the air
That every naked ash, and tardy tree
Yet leafless, showed as if the countenance
With which it looked on this delightful day
Were native to the summer.–Up the brook
I roamed in the confusion of my heart,
Alive to all things and forgetting all.
At length I to a sudden turning came
In this continuous glen, where down a rock
The Stream, so ardent in its course before,
Sent forth such sallies of glad sound, that all
Which I till then had heard, appeared the voice
Of common pleasure: beast and bird, the lamb,
The shepherd’s dog, the linnet and the thrush
Vied with this waterfall, and made a song,
Which, while I listened, seemed like the wild growth
Or like some natural produce of the air,
That could not cease to be. Green leaves were here;
But ’twas the foliage of the rocks–the birch,
The yew, the holly, and the bright green thorn,
With hanging islands of resplendent furze:
And, on a summit, distant a short space,
By any who should look beyond the dell,
A single mountain-cottage might be seen.
I gazed and gazed, and to myself I said,
‘Our thoughts at least are ours; and this wild nook,
My EMMA, I will dedicate to thee.’
—-Soon did the spot become my other home,
My dwelling, and my out-of-doors abode.
And, of the Shepherds who have seen me there,
To whom I sometimes in our idle talk
Have told this fancy, two or three, perhaps,
Years after we are gone and in our graves,
When they have cause to speak of this wild place,
May call it by the name of EMMA’S DELL.

Happy #NationalPoetryMonth

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It’s Time to Get Your Poetry On during National Poetry Month

National Poetry Month, Academy of American Poets, Poetry

Image source: Academy of American Poets

Well Y’all, today begins National Poetry Month. This annual commemoration during the month of April was inaugurated by the Academy of American Poets in 1996. Over the years, it has become the largest literary celebration in the world with schools, publishers, libraries, booksellers, and poets celebrating poetry’s vital place in our culture.

The 2018 National Poetry Month poster, designed by AIGA Medal and National Design Award-winning designer Paula Scher, celebrates typography and is suggestive of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. So stir up those keyboards, pens, pencils, and journals, and get your P-O-E-T-R-Y on!

#NationalPoetryMonth

Kicking Off National Poetry Month: What Shall Be After

Poetry, National Poetry Month, Poems, From Behind the Pen

April is National Poetry Month. This annual poetry celebration was inaugurated in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets. Let’s dive into our treasure trove of words to fluidly create amazing works in this awesome universe of poetry.

What Shall Be After

Seeking supernatural signs and wonders
overlooking the existence of their obvious presence
not hidden or invisible from sight
clearly present, yet constantly gone unnoticed
if you can’t see what’s already here
how can you recognize that which is to come?

If only we look more to spiritual guidance
and a lot less to tangible reliance
we shall witness that which was, is now
and that which is to come
has already been
the power of the circle of life.

(from Wings of the Wind: A Cornucopia of Poetry)

Happy #NationalPoetryMonth

A Day for Bad Poetry?

National Bad Poetry Day, Poetry, American Poetry, From Behind the Pen

Although it is not an official government holiday, August 18th is National Bad Poetry Day. Let’s celebrate some of your worst and most appallingly bad verse you’ve ever read or written. Who knows, something good may come from it! Here’s my bad poem to celebrate with y’all!

Beets are red

Broccoli is green

lemons are sour

my house is clean.

Who said it had to make sense? It’s bad poetry remember?

Always Celebrating Poetry!

National Poetry Month, Poetry, Celebrating Poetry

Poetry surrounds us every day. All too often, many of us simply miss those special images, smells and flavors that permeate throughout our environment. Who is your favorite poet? What is your favorite poem? Who inspires you to create poetry? Is there a particular style of poetry you favor?

This month, we are celebrating National Poetry Month, but the party is only beginning…AGAIN! Get your poetry swaggar on! Go ahead…CELEBRATE!

Celebrating National Poetry Month with poem “Voice of Birds”

Beautiful Birds From Behind the Pen

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds of the air, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish of the sea inform you.”
– Job 12:6-8 (NIV)

Voice of Birds

There was an eerie silence outdoors
the quiet before the storm
nothing was stirring
not a bumblebee
not a butterfly
not a squirrel
not even my resident wild birds.
Where did they all go?

It is evident that before any thunderstorm
before any tornado
before any earthquake
before any tsunami
before any natural disaster
or any violent shift of activity that saturates the air
diverting their attention from distractions
they get a sign, listening to God
letting them know of impeding danger
telling them to flee to a place of safety.

When you can wakeup
look outside and see birds flying
frolicking with each other
singing and chirping
constructing their nests
feeding their young
this is a clear indication
that life exists and flourishes
for they will not nest where they won’t grow
even in the cradles of a valley.

As it is written in the tenth chapter of Ecclesiastes
“For a bird of the air shall carry the voice,
and that which hath wings shall tell the matter.”

Where there is absence of noble activity of birds
life then struggles in desolation and abandonment
the death valley where vultures circle
devouring remnants of fresh road kill
and leftovers from a wild feeding frenzy.
So shall we watch and listen.

Celebrating National Poetry Month with this poem Voice of Birds from the book Diversities of Gifts: Same Spirit by author Kym Gordon Moore.